Facts About Smoking

– How and why cigarettes are so addictive –

Why does the Tobacco Industry include so many dangerous ingredients in cigarettes?

TO INCREASE THE POTENTIAL FOR ADDICTION

They do this in a number of ways.
  • Enhancing the  product by adding compounds which will increase the addictiveness of nicotine
  • Adding substances which will increase the rate at which nicotine gets delivered to the brain.
  • Making modifications to the physical property of tobacco smoke such as the particle size
  • Adding elements that make the inhalation of tobacco smoke enjoyable, i.e.,) making it less harsh on the throat, making it more palatable using flavour, controlling how fast the tobacco burns and opening the airways so that the tobacco can be inhaled into the lungs with ease

THE DANGERS OF TOBACCO SMOKE STARTS IN THE CULTIVATION

Tobacco cultivation includes the use of pesticides, fertilisers and insecticides. The fertilisers are added to enrich the soil and boost productivity. The pesticides and insecticides are used to kill off all the pests and insects that can eat the tobacco plant and destroy the crop. Imagine over time what they do to us!

According to a report issued by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids here are some of the strategies Tobacco companies have used in their composition and design of cigarettes that make them more addictive and harmful to the next generation:

WHY CIGARETTES ARE SO ADDICTIVE:
THE DESIGN AND COMPOSITION OF CIGARETTES

  • Bronchodilators : Are added to cigarettes to expand the lungs airways. This enables cigarette smoke to move through the lungs much more readily.
  • Flavouring:
  • Humectants : Humectants are cigarette additives that keep the cigarettes at the desired humidity. Dry tobacco is not usually as palatable.
  • Menthol: Cigarette flavouring that is added to reduce throat irritation by cooling down and numbing the throat. It also has been found to make the smoke “Smooth” and more palatable.
  • Sugar: Sugars are added to cigarettes as they are known to turn into aldehydes during combustion. Acetaldehyde is believed to increase the addictive  properties of nicotine. Tobacco leaves also have polysaccharides and cellulose fibres which in turn generate acetaldehyde.
  • Increased Nicotine: The Tobacco Companies control the amount of nicotine alongside the rate at which delivery occurs within the body. This ensures high levels of addiction.
  • Ammonia and Ammonia compounds: Added to cigarettes, which in turn increases the speed at which nicotine is delivered to the brain.
  • Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines: Levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines, are on the rise. American cigarettes, in particular, contain even greater levels of these tobacco-specific nitrosamines than found in cigarettes from Australia and Canada.
  • Ventilated Filters: Ventilated filters cause a smoker to inhale more deeply and with more speed. Ultimately this means the carcinogens are inhaled more deeply into the lungs ultimately ensuring smoking diseases and untimely death. In the 70’s Tobacco companies introduced “Light” cigarettes, which were proposed to be safer to smoke. These cigarettes supposedly contained less tar, but it was later determined that more substances had in fact been added to “Light” cigarettes, as well as being added in larger amounts to compensate for lack of taste and speed of nicotine delivery.
  • Organic Acid Salts: Added to create a less irritating “Smooth” smoke.